Public Health

Hepatitis C Program

Services

  • Test and screen individuals for Hepatitis C (All services are confidential)
  • Link and refer to treatment
  • Provide information and educational materials
  • Referrals and Support

Disease Reporting Requirements

Notifiable Conditions List
Notifiable Conditions Update
Reporting Protocol
HIPAA and Reporting to Public Health
Notifiable Conditions Reporting Form

How to access a Free Hepatitis C test

(915) 212-6665

701 Montana Avenue
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday
8:00 am - 11:00 am and 1:00 pm to 4:30 pm
(no appointment necessary)

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Do I have to report Hepatitis C?
    Yes, acute and chronic Hepatitis C is notifiable under Texas Law (Health & Safety Code, Chapters 81, 84, and 87)

  2. Are there consequences for not reporting Hepatitis C?
    Yes, failure to report is a Class B misdemeanor that carries a sentence of up to 180 days and a fine of up to $2,000.00 under the Texas Health and Safety Code, ยง81.049.

  3. How do I report?
    Completely fill out the Notifiable Conditions Reporting Form and submit it to the City of El Paso Department of Public Health Epidemiology Program.
    • By calling the Epidemiology Program (915) 212-6520
      Disease Reporting Hours: 24 hours a day / 7 days a week

  4. What information must be reported?
    Name, age, date of birth, sex, race/ethnicity, address, telephone number, disease, date of onset, method of diagnosis, preferred language, and name, address, and telephone number of physician.

  5. What is the time frame that Hepatitis C needs to be reported?
    Hepatitis C acute and chronic needs to be reported within 72 hours.

  6. How is HEPATITIS C transmitted?
    • Sharing injection drug equipment, even once many years ago
    • Receiving blood transfusion before 1992
    • Occupational needle-stick
    • Long term hemodialysis
    • Infected mother to her infant
    • Sexual transmission (not common, however, some sexual practices may involve blood)

  7. Who should be tested for HEPATITIS C?
    • All Baby Boomers born from 1945-1965
    • Anyone who had a blood transfusion before 1992
    • People who have injected drugs at least once in their lifetime
    • Persons living with hepatitis B or HIV/AIDS
    • Persons who were ever on long-term hemodialysis

  8. If you have hepatitis C
    • Avoid sharing needles for injecting drugs, tattooing, piercing, or any other reason
    • Do not share razors, toothbrushes, or nail clippers
    • Avoid alcohol
    • Get vaccinated for hepatitis A and hepatitis B
    • Get regular health check-ups
    • Use a latex condom when having sex
    • Discuss treatment options with your health care provider
    • GET TESTED and know your STATUS

  9. How is HEPATITIS C transmitted?
    • Sharing injection drug equipment, even once many years ago
    • Receiving blood transfusion before 1992
    • Occupational needle-stick
    • Long term hemodialysis
    • Infected mother to her infant
    • Sexual transmission (not common, however, some sexual practices may involve blood)

 

  1. Who should be tested for HEPATITIS C?
    • All Baby Boomers born from 1945-1965
    • Anyone who had a blood transfusion before 1992
    • People who have injected drugs at least once in their lifetime
    • Persons living with hepatitis B or HIV/AIDS
    • Persons who were ever on long-term hemodialysis

  2. If you have hepatitis C
    • Avoid sharing needles for injecting drugs, tattooing, piercing, or any other reason
    • Do not share razors, toothbrushes, or nail clippers
    • Avoid alcohol
    • Get vaccinated for hepatitis A and hepatitis B
    • Get regular health check-ups
    • Use a latex condom when having sex
    • Discuss treatment options with your health care provider
    • GET TESTED and know your STATUS

  3. How is HEPATITIS C transmitted?
    • Sharing injection drug equipment, even once many years ago
    • Receiving blood transfusion before 1992
    • Occupational needle-stick
    • Long term hemodialysis
    • Infected mother to her infant
    • Sexual transmission (not common, however, some sexual practices may involve blood)

  4. Who should be tested for HEPATITIS C?
    • All Baby Boomers born from 1945-1965
    • Anyone who had a blood transfusion before 1992
    • People who have injected drugs at least once in their lifetime
    • Persons living with hepatitis B or HIV/AIDS
    • Persons who were ever on long-term hemodialysis

  5. If you have hepatitis C
    • Avoid sharing needles for injecting drugs, tattooing, piercing, or any other reason
    • Do not share razors, toothbrushes, or nail clippers
    • Avoid alcohol
    • Get vaccinated for hepatitis A and hepatitis B
    • Get regular health check-ups
    • Use a latex condom when having sex
    • Discuss treatment options with your health care provider
    • GET TESTED and know your STATUS

  6. Should I tell my patient that I am going to report their condition to the City of El Paso Public Health Department?
    Yes, it is a good idea to inform your patients that their condition will be reported because they may receive communication from the department.